Shooting With Intention: A SERIES OF CONVERSATIONS WITH INSPIRATIONAL PHOTOGRAPHERS

I was speaking with a colleague recently about a blog post in which someone was writing about how a specific camera was a necessity to shooting a particular style.  Both of us agreed that while, yes, there are certain cameras that are more utilitarian for different styles of shooting, ultimately, the camera or technology doesn’t make the shooter. A photographer is only as good as his or her eye.

                      Kevin O'Meara photo by SereneSupreme

                      Kevin O'Meara photo by SereneSupreme

Moreover, with the propagation of social-media outlets and the seeming ubiquity of cameras, there are more photos taken now than ever before, yet, photographers are doing less and less with their images.  Growing up, I was allowed to shoot a roll of film. I shot 36 frames, my parents brought the roll in for development, I got 36 prints back, and looked at all 36 images.  Last week I cleared my phone of images and it was some embarrassing four-figure number and I doubt I looked at any of them after I sent them via text, and I certainly didn’t print any of them.

In the last two years since I transitioned to film and started working on Morning Sickness, I relearned how to shoot with intention. That is to say that I shot with a specific narrative in mind, to tell a story that I felt a visceral urgency to share.    

In the upcoming months I will be conducting interviews with some of my favorite photographers.  My goal is to share his or her insight in how to conceptualize a project, where they find their impetus, how they develop a manner of working, what they are trying to say through these images and ultimately how they choose to present their body of work with the world. 

From Morning Sickness © Kevin O'Meara

From Morning Sickness © Kevin O'Meara

It is my hope that in these interviews you might find something helpful in putting together a body of work. Whether it be a 10 page zine or an 11x17 hardcover monograph, the important part is you learn to use your voice in your photos.  

 

First up, Adam Jason Cohen

 

Kevin O'Meara